UltraWellness Lesson 4: Gut & Digestive Health

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IS SOMETHING WRONG with your inner tube? The inner tube of life that is your digestive system? It is likely that you suffer from (or have suffered from) some type of digestive disorder–irritable bowel, bloating, constipation, diarrhea, heartburn, reflux, gas, and things too gross to mention in print.

And you are not alone. Over 100 million Americans have digestive problems. The number three and seven top selling drugs in America are for digestive problems costing us billions and billions of dollars. There are more than 200 over-the-counter (OTC) remedies for digestive disorders, many of which – most unfortunately – can create additional digestive problems. Visits for intestinal disorders are among the most common to primary care physicians.

And that’s not even the worst news.

Most of us do not recognize or know (including most of your doctors) that digestive problems wreak havoc over your entire body leading to allergies, arthritis, autoimmune disease, rashes, acne, chronic fatigue, mood disorders, autism, dementia, cancer and more.

So having a healthy gut means more to you than just not being annoyed by a little bloating or heartburn! It is central to your entire health. It is connected to everything that happens in your body. That’s why I almost always start helping people treat chronic health problems by fixing their gut. Later I will tell you how to find out if you have a problem with your gut (though many of you won’t need me to tell you – your gut will speak for itself), and how to create a healthy digestive system. First let me explain why your gut is so important?

Good gut health

The health of your gut determines what nutrients are absorbed and what toxins, allergens and microbes are kept out, and therefore it is directly linked to the health of the total organism. Intestinal health could be defined as the optimal digestion, absorption and assimilation of food. But that is a big job that depends on many other factors. For example, the bugs in your gut are like a rain forest – a diverse and interdependent ecosystem. They must be in balance for you to be healthy.

There are five hundred species and 3 pounds of bacteria in your gut; it’s a huge chemical factory that helps you digest your food, produces vitamins, helps regulate hormones, excrete toxins and produce healing compounds that keep your gut healthy. Too many of the wrong ones like parasites, yeasts or bad bacteria, or not enough of the good ones like lactobacillus or bifidobacteria can lead to serious damage to your health.

Many diseases that seem totally unrelated to the gut, such as eczcema or psoriasis or arthritis, are actually caused by gut problems. By focusing on your gut you can get better.

Your entire immune system (and your body) is protected from the toxic environment in your the gut by a layer only one cell thick. This thin layer covers a surface area the size of a tennis court—yet it’s basically containing a sewer. If that barrier is damaged, you will get sick and create an overactive immune system, producing inflammation throughout the body.

And then there is your second brain, your gut nervous system. Your gut, in fact, contains more neurotransmitters than your brain. It is highly wired back to your brain and messages travel back and forth. When those messages altered for any reason in any direction – from the brain to the gut or the gut to the brain – your health will suffer.

Then, of course, your gut has to get rid of all the toxins produced as a byproduct of your metabolism that your liver dumps in through the bile, and if things get backed up, you will become toxic.

And in the midst of all of this, your gut must break down all the food you eat into its individual components, separate out all the vitamins and minerals and shuttle everything across that one cell thick layer into your bloodstream for you to stay healthy.

Why your gut may be in trouble

Even in a perfect world, our gut has a hard time keeping things balanced. But in our world there are many things that knock our digestive system off balance.

What are they?

  • Our low fiber, high sugar, processed food, nutrient poor, high calorie diet that makes all the wrong bacteria and yeast grow in the gut leading to a damaged ecosystem.
  • Overuse of medications that damage the gut or block normal digestive function – things like anti-inflammatories, antibiotics, acid blocking drugs, and steroids.
  • Chronic low-grade infections or gut imbalances with overgrowth of bacteria in the small intestine, yeast overgrowth, parasites, or even more serious gut infections.
  • Toxins damage the gut such as mercury and mold toxins.
  • Lack of adequate digestive enzyme function – which can come from acid blocking medication use or zinc deficiency.
  • Stress can alter the gut nervous system causing a leaky gut and changing the normal bacteria in the gut.

It is so important to understand that many diseases that seem totally unrelated to the gut, such as eczema,  psoriasis, or arthritis, are actually caused by gut problems. But by focusing on the gut you can get better.

One of my patients who suffered from eczema; a weeping, red, oozing, scaly, itchy rash all over her body, is a perfect example of someone who saw doctor after doctor, who was given salves, lotions and potions, steroids and antibiotics and never addressed the underlying cause of her problem. This 57-year old woman had severe, unrelenting eczema for eight years. She ate a high-sugar diet, and had a history of frequent vaginal yeast infections. When I saw her, I checked her gut and found she had a leaky gut; the barrier was not working and she developed 24 IgG food allergies. Her stool had no healthy bacteria and an overgrowth of yeast. She also had very high blood antibodies against yeast.

So I helped her gut improve by having her stop eating the foods she reacted to, told her to stop feeding the yeast by cutting out sugar and refined carbohydrates (which they thrive on), and killing the yeast in her gut with antifungal medications and herbs. Then I put back in healthy bacteria, and healing gut nutrients. Her eczema disappeared for the first time in eight years and stayed away!

How to get gut health

So how do you keep your gut healthy?

  • Eat whole unprocessed foods with plenty of fiber: vegetables, beans, nuts, seeds, and whole grains. Eat real food, mostly plants, as Michael Pollan author of the Omnivore’s Dilemma so simply put it.
  • If you think you have food sensitivities try an elimination diet. Cut out gluten, dairy, yeast, corn, soy and eggs for a week or two and see how your gut feels and what happens to your other symptoms.
  • Treat any infections or overgrowth of bugs like parasites, small bowel bacteria, or yeasts.
  • Take digestive enzymes with your food.
  • Take probiotics, healthy bacteria for your ecosystem.
  • Take extra omega 3 fat supplements which help cool inflammation in the gut.
  • Use gut-healing nutrients such as glutamine and zinc.

If you want to be healthy, you have to get your gut working properly. And next, I will help you understand why we are all so toxic–and why learning to detoxify is central to creating UltraWellness.

REFERENCES
1. Macdonald TT, Monteleone G. Immunity, inflammation, and allergy in the gut. Science. 2005 Mar 25;307(5717):1920-5. Review. Kalliomaki M, Salminen S, Arvilommi H, Kero P, Koskinen P, Isolauri E. Probiotics in primary prevention of atopic disease: a randomised placebo-controlled trial. Lancet. 2001 Apr 7;357(9262):1076-9. 2. Backhed F, Ley RE, Sonnenburg JL, Peterson DA, Gordon JI. Host-bacterial mutualism in the human intestine. Science. 2005 Mar 25;307(5717):1915-20. Review 3. Sicherer SH.Food allergy. Lancet. 2002 Aug 31;360(9334):701-10. Review. 4. Isolauri E, Rautava S, Kalliomaki M. Food allergy in irritable bowel syndrome: new facts and old fallacies Gut. 2004 Oct;53(10):1391-3. 5. Atkinson W, Sheldon TA, Shaath N, Whorwell PJ. Food elimination based on IgG antibodies in irritable bowel syndrome: a randomised controlled trial. Gut. 2004 Oct;53(10):1459-64. 6. Farrell R. J., Kelly C. P. Farrell R. J., Kelly C. P. Current Concepts: Celiac Sprue. N Engl J Med 2002; 346:180-188, Jan 17, 2002. 7. Bourlioux P, Koletzko B, Guarner F, Braesco V.The intestine and its microflora are partners for the protection of the host: report on the Danone Symposium “The Intelligent Intestine,” held in Paris, June 14, 2002. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Oct;78(4):675-83 8. Gershon, Michael, The Second Brain, Perennial Currents, 1999 9. Duggan C, Gannon J, Walker WA. Protective nutrients and functional foods for the gastrointestinal tract. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 May;75(5):789-808. 10. Kalliomaki, M. Probiotics in primary prevention of atopic disease: a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Lancet 2001;357:1076-79 11. Lin HC. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: a framework for understanding irritable bowel syndrome. JAMA. 2004 Aug 18;292(7):852-8.

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31 Responses to UltraWellness Lesson 4: Gut & Digestive Health

  1. Gail Snowden June 27, 2010 at 9:52 am #

    I am a Clinical Pharmacist and I just finished reading your book what role
    can a Pharmacist play ?

    • dhstaff September 2, 2010 at 4:34 pm #

      While Dr. Hyman appreciates your interest, due to the volume of inquiries he cannot respond to questions of this nature at this time.

      • Doug G August 22, 2012 at 8:20 am #

        That response is very limp wristed. You answer individual one-to-one issues but ignore someone who can help many others, a one-to-many relationship.

        To the Pharmacist: I assume you are working in a hospital in the US? I believe your scope of practice varies state to state, but you absolutely have the ability to review what proactive measures your institution uses, such as providing every patient (that is not counter-indicated for) a multivitamin, Omega 3 and probiotics. Education, communication and gut health promotion are all within your scope and you could maximize this. Find out which DOs and MDs understand Functional Medicine and get them to support and advocate for you as well. Nurses can be a wonderful ally in this fight as well. The big Drug companies want us sick because that is how they make money; we are all fighting an uphill battle to feel better and save ourselves. Good luck!

  2. magda vidal September 17, 2010 at 9:12 pm #

    Dr. Hyman thank the opportunity to open to open to you our health problems, every advice that you tell us through your blog is a big help for many people around the world I have passed on your teaching no only people around,also in Europa and South America,I am learning a lot through your scientific explanation.Dr. I have been visited my family physician even he is open but is very conventional, I took test for every things but the result is succeed ;according my physician I am fine but a I did not get help. Dr. I wonder about the vaginal discharge could be for the accumulation of yeast and it is produced for the infection in the gut ?
    Thank you.

  3. Gus Gian September 29, 2010 at 3:13 am #

    The third point in “So how do you keep your gut healthy?” is : Treat any infections or overgrowth of bugs like parasites, small bowel bacteria or yeasts.

    This seems so straight forward and the most important point, but this is, by far, the hardest thing for anyone to do. The vast majority of Doctors (and insurance companies) would never consider doing fecal testing or handing out anti-parasitic or anti-fungal prescriptions. The big question that does not seem to be addressed here is: Where do you find Functional Medicine practitioners who would consider treating this???

    • dhstaff October 8, 2010 at 6:31 pm #

      Thank you for your message and your interest in Dr. Hyman’s work. To locate a practitioner of functional medicine in your area see the “Find a Functional Medicine Practitioner” link at the Institute of Functional Medicine’s website. Here you will find a place to enter your zip code and look for practitioner’s in your area that have completed the institute’s five-day training course in functional medicine. Understand that not all of the doctors listed here will fit your particular needs. Many different medical professionals complete this training, and you will have to do additional research on your own regarding a particular practitioner’s approach and whether or not it fits your specific medical requirements. This may include calling the practioner’s office, visiting his or her website, and/or scheduling a consultation.

      Wishing You the Best of Health!

  4. Jack December 9, 2010 at 1:20 pm #

    hi.

    what do you recommend for heartburn/gerd. when i switched to a whole, nutrient dense food diet 4 months ago, i developed what seems to be chronic heartburn. i feel great otherwise, but defeating this heartburn has been a tough ride for me.
    it seems that completely changing my food intake severaly altered my gut flora. my body has not been able to adjust.

    thanks

    • Avatar of Mark Hyman, MD
      Mark Hyman, MD May 26, 2011 at 12:25 am #

      Thank you, Jack, for your message and your interest in Dr. Hyman’s work. Your question and constellation of symptoms represents a complex medical condition. Questions regarding conditions like these cannot be answered in a responsible manner via the Internet.

      If you would like information on becoming a patient at The UltraWellness Center please see “How to Become a Patient” at http://www.ultrawellnesscenter.com. That site is designed to give prospective patients a comprehensive source of information about The UltraWellness Center. You may also feel free to call The UltraWellness Center at (413) 637 9991.

      Regardless of becoming a patient at The UltraWellness Center, it sounds like you need to consult with a doctor. Please seek medical attention for the issues that you outlined in your message.

      Wishing You the Best of Health!

  5. Kari Wolsky March 5, 2011 at 8:27 am #

    If someone wants to determine the health of their gut, check for bacterial/yeast imbalances, leaky gut, nutrient absorption, etc. … Is the best test the Organic Acids? Or would you also need a GI Effects and/or Intestinal permeability panel?
    thx, Kari

  6. Linda Barbarino March 6, 2011 at 9:01 pm #

    I am on the Daniel Plan with Saddleback Church. I have read Dr Hyman’s book “Ultrametabolism”. He states that artificial sweetners are not good, but Dr Amen uses Stevia. My son is diabetic and uses the artificial sweetner, Splenda, which we have now switched to Stevia. What is Dr Hyman’s take on Stevia?

    Loving the plan and have lost 5 1/2 pounds, my husband 11 lbs, but mainly we are changing our life of eating for maximum health…already feeling so much better.
    Thank you, Linda

  7. Ecy O'Roake April 15, 2011 at 10:38 am #

    Hello My son is a recovering addict and he is on alot of medications and doesnt
    eat well. Recently he has had acne on his face only and never had it before
    I have read alot of your articles and wanted to start giving him some
    vitamins like the probiotics, zinc, vitamin B and the omega 3’s but didnt know
    how those would effect his medications and when should he take them?
    Can you please let me know asap…
    Thank you
    Loving Mom

    • Avatar of Mark Hyman, MD
      Mark Hyman, MD May 29, 2011 at 8:14 pm #

      Thank you, Ecy, for your message and your interest in Dr. Hyman’s work. To locate a practitioner of functional medicine in your area see the “Find a Functional Medicine Practitioner” link at the Institute of Functional Medicine’s website. Here you will find a place to enter your zip code and look for practitioner’s in your area that have completed the institute’s five-day training course in functional medicine. Understand that not all of the doctors listed here will fit your particular needs. Many different medical professionals complete this training, and you will have to do additional research on your own regarding a particular practitioner’s approach and whether or not it fits your specific medical requirements. This may include calling the practioner’s office, visiting his or her website, and/or scheduling a consultation.

      Wishing You the Best of Health!

  8. Paul September 30, 2011 at 9:11 am #

    I have read that eating a healthy diet can actually cause bloating. I have recently started eating a lot of vegetables, almonds, chicken, fish, black beans and healthy salads. Since starting this more healthy diet I have felt bloated. Any ideas?

    • Avatar of Mark Hyman, MD
      Mark Hyman, MD November 10, 2011 at 2:59 pm #

      Dear Paul,

      If what you have outlined here is a comprehensive overview of your current diet, it could be the beans that are a problem. For some, particularly for those with digestive imbalances, beans and whole grains can cause bloating. This is typically the result of an imbalance in gut flora. I recommend eliminating beans and whole grains for two weeks to see if this improves your situation. Usually this is enough time to “starve” the bad bacteria in your gut that cause the bloating and you can reintegrate them after the two week elimination is over. However, if the bloating returns, you may want to consider avoiding or limiting them for a longer trial. You can also try adding supplemental probiotics to support your good gut bacteria.

      Wishing You Good Health!

  9. Ann October 24, 2011 at 11:28 pm #

    My daughter was diagnosed with severe gluten intolerance 2 years ago at the age of 18. She has been eating a very good diet since off all gluten, mostly vegetarian. She still could not gain weight. She has since found she is lactose intolerant, cannot eat eggs, and is allergic to nuts. Her diet now consists of seeds, 26 grams of whey protein isolate powder 3 times a day in a shake with all natural vegetable or fruit juice, plus about 30 more grams of protein either in canned tuna, organic chicken or fish with lots of organic veggies and fruit. She is still not absorbing iron and is challenged gaining weight. She is taking Endefen and Glutagenics by Metagenics as well as zinc and omega 3’s and the enzyme, “creon”.
    We know that her gut was compromised due to too many antibiotics as a child and she began experiencing weight loss gradually due to discomfort in her gut after receiving the 3rd gardicil vaccine. We have always had a pretty healthy diet in our home, but now it is super healthy – no gluten and minimal sugars.
    We are finally working with an integrative/holistic doctor and feel we are getting on the right track but if she consumes ANY food that has been contaminated, her body reacts immediately with bloating, gas, diarrhea ( even some labeled gf food is not as it says).
    This has been very frustrating! I can only hope her gut will heal enough so she can gain weight ( she is now 5’7.5 and weighs 108!) and she can live a somewhat normal life.
    One of my other frustrations is that the GF label has become sort of a fad in restaurants. Many who advertise that they prepare GF foods do not understand cross contamination. No way she can eat any place but home for now.

    • Avatar of Mark Hyman, MD
      Mark Hyman, MD November 25, 2011 at 7:40 pm #

      Thank you, Julie, for your message and your interest in Dr. Hyman’s work. Your question and constellation of symptoms represents a complex medical condition. Questions regarding conditions like these cannot be answered in a responsible manner via the Internet.

      If you would like information on becoming a patient at The UltraWellness Center please see “How to Become a Patient” at http://www.ultrawellnesscenter.com. That site is designed to give prospective patients a comprehensive source of information about The UltraWellness Center. You may also feel free to call The UltraWellness Center at (413) 637 9991.

      Regardless of becoming a patient at The UltraWellness Center, it sounds like you need to consult with a doctor. Please seek medical attention for the issues that you outlined in your message.

      Wishing You the Best of Health!

  10. Tahi December 22, 2011 at 7:36 am #

    Hi Dr Hyman,

    I came accross your youtube channel while surfing youtube on health and natural remedies etc and I must say it was so inspiring and educational to watch and listen to your videos. I do have a question to ask you if it is not too much trouble.Over this last year, I have been trying (almost successfully, because sometimes I do return to my bad habbits) to cut out foods such as rice, bread, pasta out of my diest and in this I have mostlysucceeded although I have found that I had a sweet tooth for the longest of times as a result of stopping my diet of any forms of carbohydrates which were not plant based. I instead have been living off mainly vegetables and protein which includes, red meat, chicken, seafood and eggs (although my red meat would have some fat on it at times) and 1-2 fruits a day. I did not limit myself in terms of which fruits I ate and instead ate/eat whiever fruit I like as long as I did not eat more than two due to the sugar content. At the same time I have been on an anti-depressant (Avanza) for the last 3 years which really slowed my metabolism down even though I have tried to go for a walk at least once a day for 30-45 minutes and recently have increased that to 2 times a day. ?With all this I found that I could have regular bowel movments on a daily basis. However, I recently decreased my dosage of Avanza, my antidepresant because i am trying to ween myself off it so I can get pregnant, and have found that I am doing okay, but I have started having really bad constipation, almost as if withouth the serotonin, my gut is refusing to work! Can you please help me because I can not go back onto any anti-depresent as I am trying to get off so I can get pregnant.My cravings for sugar are now gone but I wonder if that had to do with the antidepresant I was on? I really would appreciate your reply as to what you think the problem is. I exercise daily, try my hardest to stay off bad foods, drink atleast 1-2 litres of water, but I still can’t seem to get my Bowels to move eversince I dropped from 30mg of Avanza to 15mgs.

    • Avatar of Mark Hyman, MD
      Mark Hyman, MD December 22, 2011 at 2:54 pm #

      Hi Tahi,
      Thank you for your interest in Dr. Hyman’s work. We are glad to offer some assistance with fiber and increasing the function of your bowels. But first let’s talk about serotonin and its relationship to a happy gut. Did you know that there is a gut-brain and that most of your serotonin used in your head-brain is made in your gut? It takes a healthy functioning gut to make serotonin which we need to feel good and conversely, we need serotonin and relaxation to loosen our constricted muscles so we can have proper bowel movements. So it isnt too much of a surprise to hear you are wanting improvements in both these departments as the two are intricately related!

      The best way to procure health in both areas to maintain a healthy intestinal tract with plenty of fiber, healthy bacteria and anti inflammatory nutrients. The integrity of your gut can quickly become compromised in this modern day stressful world but there is so much you can do to maintain balance in there. Like Dr. Hyman says in the article it is very important to eat a diet which is very high in fiber from whole grains, beans, legumes, vegetables and fruits and keep healthy fats like nuts and seeds abundantly in the menu too. Are you taking a probiotic for balancing the healthy bacteria? Are you taking a multivitamin, fish oil and magnesium? These all will help with healthy bowel habits. Especially the magnesium which is natures relaxation mineral. You can take a magnesium citrate, malate or glycinate 400 mg/day for improved bathroom habits. Check out the products we recommend here:http://store.ultrawellnesscenter.com/Store/Show/SearchResults/535 You can read more about MAGNESIUM here: http://drhyman.com/blog/2010/05/20/magnesium-the-most-powerful-relaxation-mineral-available/

      Also, you can take 2 tablespoons of freshly ground flax seed powder daily to help increase your fiber. If you are really struggling you might want to try an herbal laxative for the short run-only to be used for a few days to a week so you dont become dependent. We suggest cascara, senna and rhubarb.

      Finally try relaxing in a warm epsom salt bath nightly. This not only helps your bowels loosen up bit improves the quality of sleep, your mood and your perception of stress/anxiety etc.

      We hope you find relief soon!
      Lizzy

  11. Mark Wynn January 8, 2012 at 10:14 pm #

    Didn’t see mention of coffee. Does it not cause a “leaky gut?”

  12. GIna Carrillo July 4, 2012 at 1:33 pm #

    Hi. I bought all of the digestive supplements from the Healthy Living Store and have been taking them faithfully for going on three weeks now. I have a few questions on what Dr. Hyman recommends in his Blood Sugar Solution book about the Sefl-Care Plan:

    – He says to eliminate beans, grains, and all sugars for six weeks. I usually eat hummus with carrots and other fresh, organic veggies for a snack in the afternoon. Does this mean I shouldn’t eat hummus for this time period?

    – What about fruits? I usually make a smoothie with a few strawberries, half a small banana, a small handful of blueberries, flax seed and flax seed oil, and .5 cup soy milk as my morning snack. Should I not have fruit either?

    – Brown rice? I have been eating a few times per week .5 cup brown rice w/my dinners. Should that also be eliminated?

    I am also taking the daily supplements he sells online and the PGX fiber and have noticed an improvement in my bowels…until a few days ago. Then, all hell broke lose and every time I tried to eat solid food (e.g., egg whites, peanut butter with an apple, or a soup I made with pureed squash), it caused severe diarrhea and totally inflammed my entire upper and lower GI system. Also, I was getting a lot of pain (while the inflammation was there) in my lower right back (kidney maybe?).

    I made his ultra broth last night and that really soothed and calmed everything down, but now I am wondering when I do add solid food back into my diet, should i just stay away from the rice, hummus, beans of any sort, and fruit? Is this a normal occurrence while my digestive system reblanaces itself? I made a smoothy this morning and took all the digestive supplements and so far so good. However, I am confused as to what I should be eating/not eating besides what I’m already doing, which is following everything Dr. Hyman says in his book, except for the foods I already asked about. I don’t know why this flare up happened (I’ve already ruled out food poisening because others ate the same food before I got sick and they are all fine) but I want to make sure it doesn’t happen again! Thank you for your help!

    • Avatar of Dr. Hyman Nutrition Staff
      Dr. Hyman Nutrition Staff July 17, 2012 at 1:06 pm #

      Hi Gina,

      So sorry to hear about the tummy trouble. It seems you have found the broth to be soothing which is good. We have a forum for private one-on-one nutrition coaching where your questions can be personally attended to by Dr Hyman’s trained nutritionists. You will get all the attention necessary to get your digestion straightened out. Please go to: http://www.bloodsugarsolution.com/nutrition-coaching/

  13. david cooper January 27, 2013 at 8:37 pm #

    where do you practice medicine. how does one become your patient

    • Avatar of HymanStaff
      HymanStaff February 9, 2013 at 3:07 pm #

      If you would like information on becoming a patient at The UltraWellness Center, please see “How to Become a Patient” at http://www.ultrawellnesscenter.com. This site is designed to give prospective patients a comprehensive source of information about The UltraWellness Center. You may also feel free to call The UltraWellness Center at (413) 637-9991, we are located in Lenox, MA.

      Wishing You the Best of Health!

      Dr. Hyman Staff

  14. Ivan December 8, 2013 at 8:05 pm #

    Hello Dr mark
    I am suffering from a disease of the stomach and do not know what is this disease and doctors said it was a stomach virus and I can not eat fat, or where the oil has lost a lot of weight and I do not know what to do to help me and I thank you for your efforts in this site
    This is Emily
    bxmvolv @ Yahoo. som
    Please reply to my email
    Thank you for this useful site managers

    • Avatar of Team Hyman
      Team Hyman December 27, 2013 at 2:54 pm #

      Thank you for your interest In Dr. Hyman’s work. Unfortunately he cannot provide you personalized medical advice in this forum. In order to provide you the proper care you need we hope you will seek the attention of a local qualified Functional Med practitioner soon. To locate a doctor near you who practices functional medicine like Dr. Hyman, go to http://www.functionalmedicine.org/practitioner_search.aspx?id=117 and scroll down to where it says “locate a practitioner” and enter your location. Progress accordingly from there.
      You can also make an appointment to be a patient at Dr.Hyman’s UltraWellness Center in Lenox, MA. Please go to: http://www.ultrawellnesscenter.com/becoming-a-patient/
      Did you know you can work with Dr. Hyman’s nutritionists virtually? For personalized nutrition coaching, please see: http://store.drhyman.com/Store/List/Coaching-Programs
      In Good Health,
      Dr. Hyman’s Wellness Staff

  15. Katie April 7, 2014 at 8:11 pm #

    These are recommend probiotics from the Dr. Oz show;
    http://www.doctoroz.com/episode/detox-diet-burn-fat-and-lose-weight-fast?video_id=3250826653001

    For Belly Fat & Inflamation ( the one I need)
    For Frequent Colds
    For Upset Stomach & GI problems & Diarrhea

  16. Srikanth April 9, 2014 at 1:48 am #

    Hi,

    I am from india, i need help with improving my gut problems. i have been suffering chronically with ibs , ameboisis and colitis

  17. Kurt N. Woeller, D.O. July 21, 2014 at 8:24 pm #

    Great article doc. I just took part in a 3 hour physician symposium on parasitic infections here in the United States. The information provided really shows that more people need to be tested appropriately for parasites even if there are not serious digestive issues. The two parasites discussed where Giardia and Cryptosporidium which are much more common than people realize. Both of these can be resistant to chlorine (especially Crypto) and therefore taking care with respects to public swimming pools is important. Therefore, if digestive issues continue despite the best effort to identify and eliminate offending foods, as well as taking supplementation for yeast and bacterial imbalances, than parasitic stool testing is in order.

  18. Great Info On The Gut July 22, 2014 at 12:43 pm #

    Are Dr Hymans books, DVD”S etc available in South Africa. If so please forward details

  19. Kurt N. Woeller, D.O. July 30, 2014 at 12:18 pm #

    Great information in this article. Dr. Hyman commented about the transfer of information between the gut and the brain. Some of this information is distributed through vagus nerve relays that they themselves can be influenced negatively by gut pathogens. Clostriida bacteria are known to influence vagus nerve afferents. An excellent test to perform is either the Microbial Organic Acid or Organic Acids Test from Great Plains Laboratory. The two specific biomarkers 4-cresol and HPHPA are evidence of the presence of clostridia which not only effects gut function, but can alter brain chemistry as well.

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