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Episode 466
The Doctor's Farmacy

The Emerging Science Of Longevity

Open the Podcasts app and search for The Doctor’s Farmacy. If you’re viewing this site on your phone, you can just tap on the

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What if I told you we’ll reach a point in time where scientific breakthroughs will extend our lives by more than a year, for every year we are alive? This is called longevity escape velocity, and some experts think it’s only 12 to 15 years away.

Of course, getting to that point is multidimensional. It means addressing health from all angles, with personal lifestyle choices, technology, and more.

On today’s episode, I’m excited to talk to Peter Diamandis about the future of longevity interventions and why we won’t always have the same idea of aging that we do today.

Throughout this episode, we get into the science of aging, why we don’t have to age, and some of the most recent technological advances for extending longevity.

Peter and I dive into the concept of the exposome, all the things that we’re exposed to throughout life that impact our health individually, and how we can use a few key anchors for better aging. While Peter shares some pretty high-tech options for various anti-aging benefits, we also talk about the importance of basic health principles like sleep, diet, and exercise, which we can all take initiative to include in our daily lives. Strength training is one that’s made a huge difference in how I have aged, which we discuss in our conversation.

Mindset and social networks are two other topics I’m always interested in exploring, and it turns out these are also important pieces for our trajectory of aging. Never underestimate the power of optimism and community combined with the right steps.

Peter shares some of his personal longevity protocols and the work he’s doing in the field. Annual full-body MRIs, common supplements, and uncommon drug therapies are all in his wheelhouse. It’s fascinating to hear about the approaches he’s experimenting with and what he believes the future will hold for others who want to pursue these modalities.

We also talk about gene therapy, stem cells, exosomes, sirtuins, the power of placental cells, and so much more. There is a longevity renaissance on the horizon, Peter fills us in on what that looks like.

This episode is brought to you by BiOptimizers, Athletic Greens, and Rupa Health.

Try BiOptimizers Magnesium Breakthrough for 10% off by going to  magbreakthrough.com/hyman and using the code HYMAN10. 

Athletic Greens is offering my listeners 10 free travel packs of AG1 when you make your first purchase at athleticgreens.com/hyman.

Rupa Health is a place for Functional Medicine practitioners to access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs like DUTCH, Vibrant America, Genova, Great Plains, and more. You can check out a free live demo with a Q&A or create an account at RupaHealth.com.

I hope you enjoyed this conversation as much as I did. Wishing you health and happiness,
Mark Hyman, MD
Mark Hyman, MD

Here are more of the details from our interview (audio):

  1. What is longevity?
    (6:30)
  2. Our view of aging may really be one of abnormal aging
    (10:28)
  3. Why we age and why we don't have to
    (14:26)
  4. Scientific evidence of age reversal in animals
    (28:28)
  5. The fundamentals of improving health and living longer, better
    (31:25)
  6. Using diagnostics and early detection for longevity
    (40:11)
  7. Promising, out-of-the-box therapies on the horizon to enhance longevity
    (46:55)
  8. Metformin vs. diet and lifestyle for blood glucose level reversal
    (57:36)
  9. Total plasma exchange therapy
    (1:03:06)
  10. How additional life expectancy of humanity will contribute to the global economy
    (1:10:15)

Guest

 
Mark Hyman, MD

Mark Hyman, MD is the Founder and Director of The UltraWellness Center, the Head of Strategy and Innovation of Cleveland Clinic's Center for Functional Medicine, and a 13-time New York Times Bestselling author.

If you are looking for personalized medical support, we highly recommend contacting Dr. Hyman’s UltraWellness Center in Lenox, Massachusetts today.

 
Dr. Peter Diamandis

Peter Diamandis is the founder and executive chairman of the XPRIZE Foundation, which leads the world in designing and operating large-scale incentive competitions. He was recently named by Fortune as one of the “World’s 50 Greatest Leaders.” He is also the executive founder of Singularity University, a graduate-level Silicon Valley institution that counsels the world’s leaders on exponentially growing technologies.

Show Notes

  1. Pre-order your copy of Lifeforce

Transcript

Speaker 1:
Coming up on this episode of The Doctor’s Farmacy.

Peter Diamandis:
Muscle is one of the highest correlations with longevity.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Unbelievably great that you said that because I think muscle is the currency of aging.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Welcome to The Doctor’s Farmacy. I’m Dr. Mark Hyman. And it’s Farmacy with an F. A place for conversations that matter. And if you care about aging well, living a long time, or avoiding all the ravages of aging, then you better listen up because we have an extraordinary podcast today with my friend and world leader in thinking differently about how to solve our global problems, Peter Diamandis. He is such a guy. I love of him. I know him personally for a long time now, but he’s the founder and executive chairman of the XPRIZE Foundation, which leads the world in designing and operating large scale incentive competitions. So for example, going to space, or curing cancer, or doing all kinds of cool stuff. He was recently named by Fortune as one of the world’s 50 greatest leaders. He’s also the executive founder of Singularity University, a graduate level Silicon Valley institution that counsels the world leaders on exponentially run technologies.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
You’ve also just completed a book with Tony Robbins and Dr. Hariri called Life Force about aging. And you are starting a whole group of innovative longevity centers called Fountain Health, which we’re going to talk about. So welcome, Peter.

Peter Diamandis:
Thank you, Mark. It’s a pleasure. And we don’t see each other anywhere near enough.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
I know.

Peter Diamandis:
A podcast is a great excuse to catch up with each other.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
That’s true. I think we took a long walk on the Venice boardwalk at five in the morning once because that was the only time we could figure out how to get a time together. And then we ran each other in the lobby in some hotel. So listen, Peter, we are in this weird paradox right now, which is we’re seeing life expectancy go down particularly in this last year of COVID. We saw it go down for the average person probably one plus years. And if you’re African American or Hispanic, it’s up to three years of decrease in life expectancy. And at the same time we’re seeing an explosion of longevity science that’s helping us at understand the causes of aging, how to extend life, how to improve quality of life, how to stop the ravages of aging. And we’re learning all kinds of new tools, techniques, and technologies, but there’s a big mismatch there. So can you talk about, one, why we’re seeing this increase in earlier and earlier death or a decrease in life expectancy and why at the same time we’re so optimistic and hopeful about the future of longevity science.

Peter Diamandis:
Absolutely. I think there’s nothing that’s more valuable to all of us and our families than healthy years. And let’s define longevity in the first place. The average age of homage back 100,000 years ago was probably in their late 20s. And then it expanded during the middle ages into the early 30s. And then 100 years ago, it was in their 40s. Today it’s in their late 70s. And I like to think about the fact that I don’t believe humans were on the whole designed to live past age 30. We would have a baby by age 13 before there was birth control. Seriously. Before you’d go [inaudible 00:03:19] and you have a baby. And by the time you were 27 or 28, your baby was having a baby. And before McDonald’s and Whole Foods, before food was abundant, the worst thing you wanted to do to perpetuate the species was take food out of your grandchildren’s mouths. So that was very much reality for it’s the what we evolved during. And then all the diseases of older age, cancer, heart disease, dementia, even when aneurysms take people … the wear and tear of the body, all of those to diseases were never selected against if you didn’t get it past age 30. So we’re in optimal health in our 20s and 30s and then we start the ravages of old age.

Peter Diamandis:
What’s interesting, and I think you know this as much or more than I, that the conversation around longevity … And I’m going to define it more as age reversal. How do we slow aging, stop aging, even reverse aging? Which would’ve been a really crazy conversation to have had even five years ago is now become the conversation dejure in the medical community and in the venture community. And there’s more people thinking about and working on it.

Peter Diamandis:
I personally believe, and I hopefully at the end of this conversation, you’ll believe or others will that we’re about to go into a renaissance of health. We’re about to massively disrupt the health industry, reinvent it, and start to have-

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Amen.

Peter Diamandis:
Amen to that. Right? You and I are both carrying this [inaudible 00:05:13] around. [inaudible 00:05:14] revolution. Lets reinvent this crazy insane system, which is so [inaudible 00:05:21]. But I think this decade we’re going to start to have new tools to slow stop and reverse aging. And I’m convinced myself from the people I’ve spoken to. I don’t know. When I was in medical school, I didn’t get a chance to watch much TV, but I remember watching … Yeah. I would watch Star Trek once a while. When I had a little bit of time, I’d watch a Star Trek episode. And that was the way the world should see-

Dr. Mark Hyman:
[inaudible 00:05:54] with the [inaudible 00:05:54] order, right?

Peter Diamandis:
Yes.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
[inaudible 00:05:56] order.

Peter Diamandis:
Yes. Exactly. But I remember watching one television show on long lived sea life that species of like bowhead whales could live 200 plus years and the Greenland shark live four or 500 years, and sea turtles could live equal. I was like, “If they can live that long, why can’t we?” I was kind of pissed and perplexed at the same time. And I made the decision it was either a hardware problem or software problem. And that we were going to start to understand how do we change our software or how do we change our hardware? So that’s the frame that I have.

Peter Diamandis:
Yes, we’ve had some recent decreases. And a lot of the increase as you well know in average, and the word average here is the key part, average life expectancy has been the massive reduction in childhood mortality and the ability to deal with diseases early.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Clean water.

Peter Diamandis:
clean water. Oh, my God.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Sanitation.

Peter Diamandis:
Half the disease burden of the planet is due to unclean drinking water. It’s crazy. Knock that domino over. So I don’t think the recent gains in longevity are really the kinds of gains in longevity that I’m working toward.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
It was the first hurdle we had to overcome, which was still with the bad water and infectious disease. And we did a good job at that. So now we’re looking at the aging process. And as I began to look at it over the decades, it’s really clear to me that what we most of us see as aging in this country is abnormal aging. It’s biological process that have gone awry that there are really dysfunctional states of biology. And then if we learn how to work with biology to optimize those states, whether it’s inflammation, or distress, or changes to the microbiome, or hormones, or brain chemistry, or your structural system tissues, you can really stop and even reverse the phenomena that we see as aging in this country.

Peter Diamandis:
For sure, but even doing that, the question becomes can we all get to a hundred healthy? Can we get to 120 healthy? And what’s beyond that? And I’m working on both sides of the equation. The number of the companies I have and the work that I’m doing in this look that Tony and I have worked three years on, Life Force, is really around increasing your vitality, your energy, avoiding the ravages of obesity and diabetes, and heart disease, and so forth. And there’s incredible new technologies on-

Dr. Mark Hyman:
How do you do that?

Peter Diamandis:
… the horizon. We looked at all of the stuff in phase one, phase, two phase three of clinical trials. And then there’s the basics. Diet, sleeping and exercise, which we so don’t want to spend our time doing, but we must. So how do we take this a piece at a time? Let me start with a big exclamation point on something that was a big insight in writing this book.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Yeah. And the book is called Life Force. It’s out now. You can get anywhere you get books. It’s a very thick tone like war and peace, but it’s your life. If you want to put more life in your years and more years in your life, this is the book you should get.

Peter Diamandis:
Thank you. And it’s written in a way that read section one and then you can cherry pick if you’re focused on heart disease, or dementia, or inflammation, or cancer, go read the chapter on that. It’s a look at all of the … everything that’s been approved or what’s in phase two, phase three clinical research that will be approved in the next few years. It’s all hard science in a very understandable fashion. The goal of this book is to give you hope for the future. To give you a roadmap of what you should be doing now and what you should be looking for. It’s a roadmap for a longer healthier life. I’m looking for, myself, and that people may think it’s insane, a multi 100 year lifespan, but if I shoot for that and I get 120 or 150, well.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
I think you’re going for the multi hundreds. I was just going for 120. I feel like I’m kind of falling behind here with the program. Multi hundreds. I didn’t even think of that.

Peter Diamandis:
There’s a couple of things to think about. First of all, there’s a concept called longevity escape velocity, which you’re familiar with. Aubrey Grey, Ray Kurzweil has spoken about this. And the notion is that as science is beginning to understand why we age and why we don’t have to. And as science is making more and more breakthroughs in underlying diseases, there is a moment in time where for every year that you’re alive, science is extending your life for more than a year. That moment in time is called longevity escape velocity. When I ask Ray Kurzweil, Ray is brilliant. He’s passionate about this area. He’s my co-founder at Singular University. He wrote The Singularity Is Near and is written extensively about longevity. I said, “So Ray, when do you expect we’re going to hit longevity escape velocity?” His answer was in the next 12 plus … 12 to 14 years, which is-

Dr. Mark Hyman:
So basically what you’re saying is if you can survive 12 years, you can live forever? Is that the idea?

Peter Diamandis:
I’m not going to back that up. But then I went and spoke to George Church and I said to George … And George is professor of genomics at Harvard Medical School. He’s brilliant. One of the early people across gene therapy, CRISPR. He’s [inaudible 00:11:59] for companies in 24 months. We never bet against George. And I said, “When do you expect we see longevity escape velocity?” And he gave me the same answer. He said, “In the next 12 to 15 years.” But that’s crazy, right? So we’ll come back to that in a moment. What are the implications?

Dr. Mark Hyman:
So you think we can make it to early 70s, Peter? You and I will be in early 70s then.

Peter Diamandis:
I’m shooting for it. I’m definitely shooting for it. Here’s the realization that we have just in the last 10 years and you know this so well, the unveiling of CRISPR and all the different modalities of CRISPR, and of gene therapy, and of reading and writing [crosstalk 00:12:38]-

Dr. Mark Hyman:
So explain for people what CRISPR is because I don’t think people understand what that is.

Peter Diamandis:
Yeah. We have 3.2 billion letters in our genome that comes from our mother and 3.2 billion letters that comes from our father. And over the last 25 years from the human genome program and Celera, we’ve developed the technology to read that genome, to actually read out what are the 3.2 billion letters that shape you? It’s your genome. And reading your genome is useful, but what we’ve now done in the technology called CRISPR, I won’t accurately … It’s an acronym for clustered repeats is the CR in here, but it’s a technology derived from bacteria that we’re using this technology to protect themselves against bacteriophage, viruses infecting the bacteria.

Peter Diamandis:
Long story short, it’s a tool for being able to accurately edit your genome. So in the same way that Word allows you to read a document of all of the letters and words, 3.2 billion letters in the book of your life, CRISPR is the way that you can actually edit it accurately. So the ability to read your genome and edit your genome and write your genome, and then a new technology called gene therapy comes along, which is the ability to actually use a virus as a robot to inject into the cells you want a specific gene. So it’s being able to inject into the book of your life a paragraph where you want it to say something. Anyway, these are incredible tools that are giving us ability to not accept what we’re born with, but to begin-

Dr. Mark Hyman:
If you have a single mutation like let’s say Huntington’s Chorea-

Peter Diamandis:
Or thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Right?

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Right. You can actually edit those genes to actually change the proteins that are produced, to change the course of that person’s life.

Peter Diamandis:
And what’s incredible is it’s not a treatment for these genetic diseases, it is a cure. It is like one and done, you’re cured. And so Editas, the company started by George Church to Boston has a CRISPR treatment to cure a form of genetic blindness. And so a person’s born with this particular genetic mutation, they’re blind, an injection in the back of the eye and they’re … they could see again, they’re cured. It’s biblical in nature. It’s incredible stuff, but it’s interesting. So now the question is if you have these 3.2 billion letters when you’re born and when you have it, when you’re the same 3.2 billion letters at age 25, when you’re … when you got all your musculature on the beach or you’re in the bikini, you look great, you feel great. And then you have the same 3.2 billion letters when you’re 80. Why don’t you look the same?

Dr. Mark Hyman:
That’s a great question.

Peter Diamandis:
What is it? I’m running the same computer code. Why am I looking [crosstalk 00:15:53]?

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Yes. Why is the software output different, right?

Peter Diamandis:
Yeah. And so this is fascinating. This is the work that was best explained so far by Dr. David Sinclair also at a Harvard Medical School, who wrote a book called Lifespan, which is amazing. I think Lifespan and Life Force are two books that go hand in hand.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
He must know something about aging because he’s 50 and he looks 12.

Peter Diamandis:
I tell you.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
What’s up with that? I love David.

Peter Diamandis:
He’s my poster child. You know when you’re in a marathon and there’s somebody that you’re pacing yourself against? He’s the guy that I’m like, “I’ve got to pace myself against David.” He looks like he’s 30 and [inaudible 00:16:37]. Right in the book in the chapter, we have all these heroes in the book, David Sinclair, we say David’s got two numbers. He’s 53 in a chronological age, but his biological age by aging clock is 35 or something like that.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
And it works. I did mine. I’m 62. I did it a few years ago, but it was 39. It’s possible.

Peter Diamandis:
Yeah. It is possible. Yeah. I’m 60 and I’m tracking in my mid late 40s. My goal is to get down to David Sinclair level of my mid 30s. I feel like I’m 28, but I have sort of the emotional maturity of a nine-year-old, but that’s a different story.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Oh, no. I think you’re good. You’re, you’re curious, you’re in wonder all the time in awe, which is actually a trait you should never give up. And that’s a thing I like about you most, Peter.

Peter Diamandis:
So let’s go back to the question opinion. You have your same genome at birth, at 25, and 80. What’s going on? And so it’s a concept called the epigenome. Epi, meaning above in Greek. And it is in fact, the way that your genome is controlled. So what’s going on at birth, at age 25, and 80 plus? As you know is not all your genes are turned on or all your genes are turned off. So your epigenome controls which genes are on and which genes are off. In your youth, you’ve got many more genes turned on to create the proteins in your skin. And as you get older, some of those genes turn off and they should be on. Genes that are on that should be off and genes that are off that should be on. And that is what’s thought to account for the aging process. And so let’s double click on that because there’s a very interesting construct and rationale of why that occurs. And I find it when I’m on the stage talking about aging, I want to convey this because it helps people understand what’s going on.

Peter Diamandis:
So it turns out that we have a set of seven genes, which are our sirtuin genes that generate the sirtuin proteins. And these sirtuins control which genes are on and which genes are off. It controls the epigenome, but these sirtuins also are responsible for DNA repair. And I want you to imagine that your 3.2 billion letters are the piano keys on the piano and you’re playing the piano. You’re the sirtuins that are determining which keys should be played and which keys should not be played. And early in your life, you’ve got this thing on the side of you like this clock you have to repair. And early in your life, the clock is doing fine and you’re not distracted by repairing it, but as you get … as the pianist, as you’re continuing in life, you’re playing the right keys, you’re pushing the right ones and not pushing the wrong ones, but as things go on, you have to repair this clock more and more and you’re being distracted. So you’re trying to keep the clock repaired and at the same time you’re trying to play the right keys and it becomes more and more difficult.

Peter Diamandis:
But then there’s another part of this, which is that these sirtuin proteins are power by NAD in your cells. And as you get older, your NAD levels sort of a energy currency, if you would, i the cells, your energy levels drop by half. So all of a sudden, as the pianist, you’re spending more and more of your time repairing … during repairs and having less and less energy to do the whole thing and you become distracted and the epigenome regulation of your body falls apart. So what David believes he has been able to demonstrate, and we talk about this in the chapter on David Sinclair and in another chapter I wrote on longevity, that he has discovered that using three out of the four Yamanaka factors allow him to reset the epigenome in the living.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Because it’s a big mouthful. What’s a Yamanaka factor?

Peter Diamandis:
Yeah. What’s a Yamanaka factor? It’s interesting, but can I get one up the kitchen counter? So a guy, Dr. Yamanaka, Nobel Laureate discovered that you can take a differentiated cell, a skin cell, a nerve cell, a hard cell, a liver cell, whatever it is and return it back to its pluripotent state. What does that mean? When we’re born, we have one cell like the fertilized egg. That grows, and grows, and grows and eventually differentiates into all these different kinds of cells in your body. Your skin cell, your bone, your muscle, your heart, your nerve, your liver, your kidney. And all those cells have the same genome, but again it’s which of those genes are turned on and which of those genes are turned off determine what kind of a cell it is, what its function is.

Peter Diamandis:
We’ve heard of stem cells and those stem cells have the ability to differentiate into any one of these specialized cells. Well, Yamanaka determined that these four factors, these four genes, proteins can … If you utilize them, you can turn a differentiated cell back into a pluripotent stem cell that could then you could take it from a skin cell to a pluripotent stem cell and then make it a heart fell and make it a nerve cell.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Wow. So you can reverse the process of the evolution of the cell into its … from its spinal form into its preexisting state.

Peter Diamandis:
Exactly. And we’ll come back to this in a little bit on the work of Dean Kamen, who’s manufacturing or backup set of organs for all of us, which is insane. Hold on for that one. So long story short, David Sinclair working with three out of the four Yamanaka factors was able to reverse the age and publish this in December of 2020 on the cover of nature reverse the age of the vision system of long lived mice. So these mice had gone lined with a whole set of age related decapitation of their vision system, their optic nerve. He was able to bring them back to an earlier state where they were fully functional. It’s since been done with the heart of mice. And so the question is, can you reverse … can you get your body to go back to a state of, “Hey, this is what your body should look like.” These are the gene that should be on and off when you’re … instead of 60, when you’re at 40 or at 30. And it’s the concept is age reversal which is extraordinary. I’m working on mark right now. When we did our walk, we talked about this. I’m working on 100 million age reversal XPRIZE.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Yeah. That’s exciting.

Peter Diamandis:
Yeah. I’ve raised about three quarters of the capital for it. We launched a hundred million dollar gigaton carbon removal XPRIZE that Elon funded. And this is the next big one I want to do. Get teams are around the world working on how do you reverse aging? In this case, we’ll ask him to do 20%. I mean 25%. 20 years in humans with a therapeutic that lasts less than a year, but there’s serious conversations about this now.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Yeah. The idea that we have this software that kind of gets gummed up as we get older, but there are ways to sort of reset it through various strategies around longevity is really intriguing to me because when I look at the common age related diseases, they’re all have common mechanisms. Inflammation, oxidative stress, change in the microbiome that are all impact that, hormonal dysregulation, mitochondrial dysfunction. And you sort of start to look at the root causes of all this are toxin overload and accumulation of all that. Those just seem to me to be the sort of low hanging fruit to kind of work on to affect the averages of aging. And a lot of the things that influence those are what we call the exposome, which is what are your genes are exposed to when you’re talking about how do we modify gene expression and epigenetics. Your exposome includes everything from the air you breathe, the water you drink, the thoughts you have-

Peter Diamandis:
The altitude you’re born in.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
… the altitude you’re at, the microbiomes in your gut, to the food you’re eating, the exercise, the way you … whether you are loved or not loved. There are all things that are affecting these things in real time. So the question is in your research on longevity and in Life Force, what did you come up with the sort of the key anchors that people need to focus on to improve the quality of their health to add more life to their years and more years to their life? Well, because at the end of the day, people listening are like, “What’s in it for me?”

Peter Diamandis:
Listen, in no surprise markets. Everything you’ve been teaching, and talking about, and writing about for quite some time. You are definitely the guiding light-

Dr. Mark Hyman:
I’m the loudest voice, maybe. The most annoying voice.

Peter Diamandis:
Listen, I think it’s very clear. People should have hope that there are incredible technologies in development right now and incredible therapeutics. I’m involved with a number of companies I have co-founded that are doing things we can talk about those. And you’re job is to live long enough to intercept all these technologies. And there are things you can do right now. And I think about them as the fundamentals. Number one, sleep eight hours. If the body could have evolved to do as well in less than eight hours, it would have. While we’re sleeping, we are sitting ducks. And so a species of hominids that could sleep for six hours and do as well would’ve outcompeted everybody else who sleep eight hours. So for me, that’s obvious. Number two, it’s what you eat. Eliminate sugar is first, second, and third in the list, and then a whole.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Sugar and flour.

Peter Diamandis:
It’s the work that you and Dean Ornish talk about. I just try and do my best. I’m not a saint, but I just try and remove all sugar. The way I do it, I don’t buy it at the supermarket. If it’s not in the house, I can’t eat it. When you willpower a week, don’t have it there.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
That’s what I always say. If there’s chunky monkey in the freezer, I’m done. If I have a bad day and there’s a pin and chunky monkey, there’s no holding me back. But if it’s not there, I’ll look, I’ll feel depressed for a minute and I’ll go back to my room and read a book.

Peter Diamandis:
Exactly. 100%. It’s drinking two, three or more liters of water per day, it is exercise. I try and get my 10,000 steps in every day. And I try and do at least a lightweight workout. I’m not going to bench a new record, but I’m using free weights to keep muscle tone. Muscle is one of the high is correlations with longevity.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Unbelievably great that you said that because I think muscle is the currency of aging. And as we age, we lose muscle and muscle is where our metabolism is. When it’s lost, we replace it with fat, which generates inflammation and oxidative stress and tanks our good hormones like testosterone and growth hormone, and raises our bad hormones like cortisol, all of which accelerate aging. So most people don’t think about muscle as an organ. They don’t think about how to preserve muscle, create muscle, create better efficient muscle, more highly functional muscle, more mitochondrial intelligence, and function. Those are really, to me, some of the most important things with aging. There’s really two aspects that I hear you talking about. One is sort of the basic foundational things we know about how to actually upgrade your life and upgrade your biological software through lifestyle.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Yeah. And then there’s all these really extraordinary techniques, which are gene editing techniques, which are using very sort of innovative compounds to affect some of these gene expression patterns to things that I don’t even probably know about that you’ve uncovered that are being explored. Whether it’s things like NAD or it’s things that help regulate the economic factors. Whatever those are, there’s a lot of that going on. So I think the basic stuff people have a pretty good handle on is sort of the obvious stuff.

Peter Diamandis:
Yeah. There’s a couple of other things I just want to hit on. Mindset and attitude is probably one of the most important things. If you think you’re going to die, you can will yourself to death. Who do you hang out with? Are you hanging out with people at the very end of their life? Are you hanging out with people who are youthful? Your mindset is so fundamentally important. And do you have a vision? Is the vision for the years ahead of you bigger than the vision for the years behind you? That’s fundamental. I’m more excited to be alive now than I ever have. And the projects I have are going keep me going for the next few 100 years. So I’m super pumped about that.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Yeah. You’re right. It’s really true. When you look at meaning and purpose, it actually directly correlates with longevity and optimists live longer even if they’re wrong. I actually spent a lot of time this last week with a 99 year-old-man who is brilliant, still working. I said, “”So what are your interests?” “Well, I’m interested in longevity.” And he was 99 years old. He’s talking about the projects he’s working on, the movies, the film he’s making. It’s really stunning to me this see someone that age be so engaged in life, and joyful, and committed to his friends, and his community, and his family, active. I was like, “Wow, that is just really remarkable.” You probably know him, Norman Leer. He’s just an amazing guy.

Peter Diamandis:
Oh, I love Norman Leer.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
To be that up close and personal with him and hear him talk about his life and his stories, but also talking about what he’s dreaming about for the future. He’s dreaming about the future and that is pretty exciting to me.

Peter Diamandis:
There’s another category of what you can do right now that’s important. And I jokingly call it not dying from something stupid.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
There you go.

Peter Diamandis:
But it’s really important.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
I call it how to die young as late as possible.

Peter Diamandis:
Okay. Here’s a realization. All of us are optimist about our lives, about what’s going on inside our body. We think we’re fine, we’re great, moving along, we’re rushing to work and to vacation and spending time with our families. And that’s all awesome, but we actually have no idea what’s going on inside our bodies until you end up in the pain in your side in the hospital and the doctor says, “Listen, I hate to tell you this, but whatever it is.” And so this is the work that I had done early on in human longevity and really we’ve taken it the next level with a platform called fountain life. We talk about fountain life in the book, but it’s the notion that every year I go for digital upload. I go to HOI, Human Longevity, Inc or Fountain Life and I do a full body MRI. Head to toe, brain vasculature, a clearly coronary CTA that uses AI to look for soft plaque versus calcified plaque. Calcified plaque is safe. It’s the soft plaque that can rupture that you have to worry about. My DEXA scan my genome, my microbiome, my omics, and so forth.

Peter Diamandis:
My goal is two things. Has anything changed in the last year I need to know about? So first of all, it’s given me a baseline of this is the way my body is. Originally when I first did it, I saw I had a large aortic root where the aorta enters the heart. And I was like, “Is that dangerous? Should I be concerned?” But then after doing it four or five times, it didn’t change. That’s just me. That’s just normal for me. But we have found in 14, 15% of people who’ve come through it, and these are all relatively wealthy who can get any healthcare they want, who are typically in their 50s, 60s, 70s, two and a half percent have an aneurysm they didn’t know about, 2% have cancer they didn’t know about. And all in all, I think the number was 14 or 15% have something that they need to know about that’s going to impact their health. And so that’s my wear your seatbelt, get yourself uploaded every you. And if you find something, take action. People say, “I don’t want to know.” And I call it bullshit. Of course you want to know because you can do a lot about things right now.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Absolutely. I think what you’re talking about is really important, Peter, because what you’re talking about sort of a host of diagnostics that are often are not something we would get at traditional doctors. Hopefully the price are going to come down so we can get them, but there’s a lot of imaging and a lot of diagnostics that are great, but then there’s a whole layer of things that doctors aren’t looking at. And I see this all the time with people who are coming to see me for a functional medicine. There’s subclinical changes that happen. And you can detect changes in your biology and physiology decades before you ever get a symptom or before you get diagnosed with the disease, whether it’s insulin resistance that you can see early by raising … looking at insulin levels after a meal or fasting insulin, which is a first thing that go way before your blood sugar goes up, or whether there’s low grade autoimmune disease, whether your microbiomes are off, or you have nutritional deficiencies, your mitochondrial functioning. You can start to see these things. And it’s really just like a tuneup. They’re not quite diseases yet. And then traditional medicine hasn’t had a way of thinking about this because it’s really complex. And what’s

Dr. Mark Hyman:
I think emerging and what you’re finding, Peter, is that there’s this emerging field of omics revolution, which is when you think about the number of data points that we get, when you go to the doctor, you get 20, 30, 40, 50 lab tests maybe. There’s literally tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of things you could measure most of which we’re ignoring. David Ferman at Stanford has looked at the throughput analysis of literally thousands and thousands of molecules around inflammation, which of those ones that relate to aging and chronic disease. And there are things you never heard of before. The things that doctor never test for, that aren’t a lab acquisition, but are the most important thing that we can be measuring to look at long-term inflammation and aging. So I think there’s a whole host of things that we can start to look at. And from a functional medicine perspective, that’s what excites me because I see these things and I can then see the changes that happen, I can see the changes in biology that happened. And I’ve noticed in myself, I’ve literally kind of changed my biology.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
I posted a picture recently of when I was 40 and when I was 60 of my body and it’s totally different. I was sort of skinny, fat back then. I was eating more carbohydrates. I wasn’t overweight, but I didn’t really have much muscle. If you look at me now, I look like 20 years younger, but I was 20 years younger than that picture than I am now. It’s quite staggering what you can do when you begin to understand these things.

Peter Diamandis:
Yeah. And there are two reasons we haven’t done this in the past, maybe three. One, we couldn’t. Before we couldn’t measure it. We didn’t even know it was there or measurable, but we now do. And second it’s getting cheaper and cheaper all the time, but the third is that no human physician could ever deal with the amount of data we’re talking about. It’s a massive amount of data. And it’s really the use of machine learning algorithms that are helping us understand the patterns, understand what it means. I think it’s going to become in the next five years malpractice not to do a diagnosis without AI in the loop just because-

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Absolutely.

Peter Diamandis:
Yeah.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
I’ve seen literally millions and millions of data points on tens of thousands of patients, but I’m one guy. I’ve seen patterns and correlations on things that no one has described before and yet I know are true because I see them over and over again, but nobody’s really kind of described it in the literature and I think that’s just sort of the tip of the iceberg of what’s really going on when you look at these things. So that’s sort of excited thing was we can look at the longevity perspective. We get to look at how do we start to do diagnostics differently. Not looking for disease per se, but looking for sort of variations from optimal function and health.

Peter Diamandis:
So that’s what we’ve done at Fountain Life. By the end of 2022, we’ll have a dozen centers set up in Dubai, in India, in UK, and Toronto, and about 10 in the US. We’re doubling in the 2022 timeframe. And we basically digitize you and upload you into the system where we can understand what changes have occurred since last time. And that’s part of what Fountain Life does. The other part is performance and recovery. What are your goals? Is it muscle, is it obesity, is it energy levels? And we help direct you in our programs that way. But then there’s a regenerative medicine side that is important because the regenerative medicine arena is growing tremendously, but we’ve built something called Fountain OS, which is an app that allows you to upload the data into your app, but it allows you to provision these things wherever you are.

Peter Diamandis:
So if you don’t live in the city of where there’s a Fountain center, we have identified the imaging centers and facilities in Schenectady or in Des Moines where you can get all of the tests put together and upload it to the system independent of where you live. The fun part is we have something called Fountain Health which is life … I’m sorry, health insurance business. Health insurance, it pays you after you have disease and after you had treatment. But what if instead health insurance was the opposite, which is we’re going to provide you all of the imaging that Fountain Life does for free every year to catch disease at the very beginning and prevent it in the first place. So it’s insurance that’s going to be for self-insured companies initially, but it’s about giving all of your employees all of this extensive testing as part of the insurance package for free to prevent the disease in the long-run. So Fountain Life is doing great. I’m super pumped about it.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
So basically these clinics where you can go and get a range of different assessments and therapies that assess where you are now, where you are in the deviations, in your sort of longevity track, and how to actually change those back to a younger biological age, using a combination of lifestyle, supportive therapies, functional medicine, regenerative therapies that are all out there now and being able to incorporate as in real time as new therapies come online when we hit longevity escape velocity, well be able to actually get to take advantage of that, which is pretty exciting.

Peter Diamandis:
Yeah. It is. We also have a very limited … We call our edge program. So as you all know, there’s a lot of open investigational new drugs out there than the cutting edge like rapamycin, like total plasma exchange, and so forth. So we give a small number of our Fountain Life members the ability to participate in these research protocols.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
One of the things that are on the horizon from that sort of … other than the foundational lifestyle stuff, which is really all the stuff we’ve been talking about forever, but it actually really matters. Whether it’s relationships, and community, and meaning, and purpose, and eating whole foods. All those things obviously are important. And then there may be some new things around various kinds of supplements or NAD and things that are coming out, but there’s a whole range of other things that people are exploring, whether massive stem cell injections, they’re doing 200 million stem cells IV, they’re doing exosomes, ozone, hyperbaric oxygen, they’re even doing blood change. There’s studies in animals where you can basically hook up a young rat to an old rat and an old rat becomes a young rat. So there’s all kinds of crazy stuff going on there. What did you find within Life Force that was the most promising among all those different [inaudible 00:42:28]? What should people think about?

Peter Diamandis:
Yeah. I’ll share a few and these are the ones that I know personally it because I’m involved. So one of the companies that Bob Hariri who’s also a co-author and I started, Bob as the chairman and CEO and I serve as co-founder and vice chairman called Cellularity. We built the largest cellular manufacturing facility out there. It’s based out of New Jersey. If anybody is pregnant listening to this, you know that you can store your cord blood, but what Cellularity does also is store the child’s placenta. We receive the placenta in the facility, we take the cord blood, but then we decellularize the placenta and pull out of it the placental T cells, natural killer cells, and stem cells. And that’s an incredible treasure chest of valuable cellular medicine to capability. I think of the placenta as the 3D printer that manufactures the baby. Every cell that becomes the baby has come from the placenta. And the placenta, we actually pay to throw it away afterwards, but I want you to imagine that when we mine the placenta for these cells … We have a Bob Hariri talk that says, “Listen, if your baby came with an extra spare set of organs, would you throw them away?” And that’s what I think about this.

Peter Diamandis:
So Cellularity is producing large supplies of very high quality stem cells and exosomes. Again, the placenta is also very rich in exosomes. And exosomes are these small vesicles of growth factors that are pumped out by the stem cells, but then the other cells, natural killer cells, for example, and this is what the company’s current business that we went public on back in summer of ’21, it turns out that the placenta is an incredibly protective organ for a fetus. If the mother has a viral infection, the placenta and the natural killer cells of the placenta protect the baby. If the mother has cancer, it’s very, very rare that you ever get a metastases to the fetus. It turns out that natural killer cells are the cells that protect you today as you’re sitting there against cancer and viral infection.

Peter Diamandis:
So what we’ve been able to do is take these most powerful natural killer cells from the placenta and then develop them and use them as drugs and infuse them into the body to augment your immunity. And we have incredible science data, some of which we release some of which will be released. And so then same thing for T-cells and CAR T-cells, which you’re familiar with, but then the ability to use stem cells … So one of the hallmarks of aging is that you’re … The stem cells in your body and these cells are resonant throughout your body, in your fat, in your muscle, other tissues, these cells that are sitting there latent ready to differentiate into muscle liver, lung, kidney, whatever it might be, but your stem cell populations in your body can go down by 100 or 1,000 fold. So it’s this ability to repair your body.

Peter Diamandis:
The analogy that I love, I don’t know if it was Aubrey Grey who first came up with this, he said, “Imagine you build a brand new mansion and this mansion is amazing. It’s beautiful. It’s got 30 rooms in it and it’s so much work to keep up, but you have a army of maintenance and repair people in the mansion. But as the mansion goes on, these repair people start to die and they start to go senile and eventually the mansion goes into disrepair.” And this is like the human body where the stem cells are the regenerative agents. They’re the repair agents that start to reduce in number 100 fold, 1,000 fold. And as the age, they become less capable. But what if you could augment the stem cells in your body from this really incredibly … This will date of us in terms of our computer background. Like the boot disk, the earliest software. So that’s fun. That’s super cool tech.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
So basically the idea is this. Preserve your placenta when you’re born and then keep it as a storage house for all these amazing healing cells that you can access it anytime when you get sick when you’re older. Is that the idea?

Peter Diamandis:
Yes. And it turns out that the placenta, it becomes a universal donor. Placental cells are universal donor because they haven’t been thymonized yet. If you imagine a surrogate mother who’s not related to the child in any way, but she doesn’t reject the child and the child-

Dr. Mark Hyman:
That’s right.

Peter Diamandis:
… reject her. And so the placenta’s cells are a universal and recipient.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
People are using exosome from placenta and those things, right?

Peter Diamandis:
Yeah. 100%. And Cellularity is developing those products and going into IND, Investigational New Drugs. Idea of cells as drugs, very powerful. Another company, Vaxxinity, which I’m very proud of again serving as co-founder and vice chairman, it’s a company that realized … So there’s $160 billion biologics market out there. And it’s the idea of using antibodies that you inject into your body. And those antibodies can go find a specific protein and knock it out. So I have high cholesterol, it’s familial, it’s genetic, high LDL, low-density lipoprotein. And I don’t like taking statins. It’s my personal opinion, but it turns out that there’s this monoclonal antibody called Repatha against an enzyme in my liver called PCSK9. And PCSK9 in the liver is the enzyme that generates the LDL.

Peter Diamandis:
I think it’s Regeneron that makes this monoclonal antibody. They make it in a giant fat in New York. And every two weeks I get this little self injector, five MLS injecting my belly fat. And it’s about six, $700 per injection. It’s not cheap.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
It’s a lot.

Peter Diamandis:
And it’s for that reason, it’s the last line of defense. But those antibodies I’m injecting into my body go to my liver and they shut down the PCSK9 enzyme and my LDL level falls beautifully in line. And it’s kept me really feeling healthy and safe, but it’s expensive to have those antibodies created outside the body and-

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Body. Right.

Peter Diamandis:
… [crosstalk 00:50:13] so forth. Vaxxinity, it’s V-A-X-X-I-N-I-T-Y is the name of it. What we’ve done with Vaxxinity is been able to design a vaccine that you inject once a year, maybe twice a year. And that vaccine turns your immune system into the producer of those monoclonal antibodies. And so you vaccinate yourself against this endogenous protein, this protein in your body, against PCSK9. And so we’re in phase one there and phase one on same typical target for migraines, a phase two for Parkinson’s, and a phase three for Alzheimer’s. So it’s the idea of imagine being able to give yourself an injection once a year and protect from ever coming down with Alzheimer’s.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
That would be amazing. So there’s going to be kind of cool little hacks that we can use to somehow save up some of the age related diseases, but what you’re doing a lot with this work on life force and longevity is actually going upstream to get to the root causes years before you’ll ever get the problem.

Peter Diamandis:
Yes. Remember we talked earlier about the sirtuins that are doing this dance between DNA repair and DNA regulation, and they’re powered by NAD that’s dropping in the cells as we age. And so one of the things you can do is supplement the precursors of NAD. And this is a lot of the work that’s done by David Sinclair as well. And so I take NMN, nicotinamide mononucleotide, that is converted to NAD intracellularly. And that helps to, at least in theory, I’ve not been measuring my NAD levels, but up bright increase the amount of NAD in my cells to keep those sirtuins bouncing back and forth and keeping me, my epigenome properly regulated. So there are things like that. I take Metformin to reduce my blood glucose levels. There’s a whole slew of, of things. There’s a number of trials going on and I’m tracking all of these age reversal therapeutics and companies out there.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Essentially, when you look at the Metformin, for example, I remember the diabetes prevention trial. And it showed that giving Metformin helped to reduce the progression to type two diabetes from pre-diabetics by a relatively good amount, but the lifestyle and diet were far exceeded the benefit of Metformin. So is it incrementally in terms of his benefit or you think it has some other benefit? Because to me, it seems like if we just reverse instant resistance doing the things that we know work, which is lifestyle, that actually you won’t need Metformin.

Peter Diamandis:
Yeah. So for me, it’s built in suspenders. I’m really focused in on my diet, and my sleep, and my exercise and my mindset. I’m doing everything I can to maximize my opportunities to intercept the technologies that are coming our way. It’s a choice. Chunky monkey and sitting on couch watching Netflix for five hours a day is a choice.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Yes. For sure. Yeah. That’s right. I think it’s interesting to sort through all these different technologies with it’s lifestyle things, supplements like NMN or NAD. And what is the 80/20 on it? What is 80/20? And by that I mean what are the most leverage interventions that we can focus on now given what we know for people listening? Could you help us sort of come down with what are the 80/20 on this? What are the 20% of things that are going to make 80% of the difference? And if we focus on those, we’re going to be good. And then we can kind of micro tune the other things as the research comes on and we hit this longevity escape velocity.

Peter Diamandis:
There is so much data coming out. And so this massive increase in information, and stories, and journal articles, and such. I’ll just share with you something that I’m pumped about. I built over the last couple of years, a platform called fountain … called Future Loop. And it creates a newsletter for me called Longevity Insider. You go to longevityinsider.org and it’s free. We scan 250,000 to half a million journals, newspapers, magazines, tweet every day, looking for valid future positive semantic breakthroughs on converging technologies impacting health and longevity. I get the top 15 articles every day on breakthroughs regarding health, and longevity, and age reversal. And we have built an AI on it that summarizes the article really well about what it is and why it’s important. Part of the mindset part is realizing, holy shit. That’s happening, and that’s happening, and that’s happening. It’s a realization that the amount … that this area is massively exploding in a very positive sense. So longevityinsider.org is … You can go and get on instead of all of the dystopian news you get every day from everything else you read.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Yeah. Absolutely. So in terms of these things that you’re most excited about, is it these gene editing things, is it the stem cell work, is it the sort of exosomes? What’s sort of the thing that’s sort of most exciting on the horizon?

Peter Diamandis:
I think it’s all of these. We did 160 interviews in the book. We are all given a genetic lottery when we’re born depending upon our mother and our father. And there are things that you can do and lifestyle changes which we should and must do, but the tools that are coming to attack the different hallmarks of aging from stem cells and exosomes on one end to gene therapies to just even treatments for mitochondrial dysfunction. I’m tracking as many of them in all of them. I’m lucky Found Life as a platform is where I have a list of an incredible group of advisors and supporters who are the fiduciaries to help us identify and then say, “This is scientifically credible. Let’s watch this. Let’s make this available to our members.” And so I’m constantly tracking that. There’s another technology coming out of total plasma exchange where you basically changing the oil in your car.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Can you explain that?

Peter Diamandis:
So in our bodies, we’re accumulating product of metabolism all the time and our liver and our kidney should clear that, but it doesn’t always. And so there is a couple of things happen. One, as you said, experiments done in what are called the parabiosis experiment, where the circulatory system of a young mouse and the circulatory system of an old mouse were connected and the young mouse got old and the old mouse got young. Yeah. This is like the vampire experiments. And it was like, “What up? What’s going on here? What’s these factors in the blood that give you [crosstalk 00:58:48]-

Dr. Mark Hyman:
The blood. You clean them out.

Peter Diamandis:
… in this blood exchange?” And so two things came out of that. One is out of Harvard, out of Amy Wagers lab came identification of a protein called GDF11. And GDF11 is a protein that goes … You produce less and less of it as you age. And there are antibodies against it as you age. And so in mice, when you give GDF11, and we’re just in the animal phase studies, the mouse reduces inflammation. It increases its circulatory capabilities. You get a lot of revitalization from GDF11. So it may be that GDF11 is the factor response for the rejuvenation of these older mice. So that’s one thing. And so we write about GDF11 in the book. I’m an investor in a company called Elevian that is producing GDF11 or doing the research behind GDF11. But then the same scientists took these older mice and basically took blood out, spun out the cells and put the cells back in, but with albumin, and dextro, and saline. Basically, albumin as you well know, is the major protein in the bloodstream. And your blood is a lot of albumin, a lot of salt water, and some sugar. And so they took all of the plasma out and replaced the plasma with fresh constituent parts. And that revitalized the old mice too. And so there is in particular reducing signs of dementia.

Peter Diamandis:
There’s a lot of protocols going on right now. We’re tracking that inside of Fountain Life. It’ll probably become available in our edge program. I look forward to trying it, and it’s a notion of basically changing your oil.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
So what is it? Plasmapheresis, is that what it is?

Peter Diamandis:
Yes. Again, you’re pulling out two liters of blood, you’re spitting it down, and you’re replacing the plasma with albumin and dextro. It’s a ringer solution.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
So the series is a lot of old crud, kind of like space junk floating around in your blood that needs to be cleaned out that can cause aging, and inflammation, and oxidative stress, and all these problems. And that kind of exchanging your plasma or blood, this will actually help to improve your overall health. I think a lot of doctors in plasma free and other things for chronic illness and seeing really significant benefits.

Peter Diamandis:
There’s just so many different. We could spend another three hours. And maybe we’ll do another session to actually dive down into another dozen targets, but it’s extraordinary. I’ve never been more excited about disrupting the healthcare industry and extending the healthy lifespan. And there’s nothing more important than that. I love the saying the man or woman who has their health has a 1,000 dreams and the man or woman who does not has but one.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
You’re right, Peter. You’re in this moment where the kinds of things you’re talking about are not just disrupting aging and longevity science, but they’re disrupting our whole way of thinking about chronic illness and subsequently our healthcare system. Yeah. Now we need to refocus on the science of creating health because what you’re talking about, a lot of the therapies you’re talking about are not necessarily targeted at specific disease, they’re targeted at mechanisms that are related to the degradation of our biology over time that are really about optimizing the inherent functions of the body. So they’re supportive and enhancing therapies. I think them in between antibiotics and probiotics. An antibiotic will kill bug, but a probiotics will help your gut work better. And then a lot of these therapies are much like that. They’re not designed to be interfering or blocking a pathway as much as actually enhancing and optimizing the functions of your biology that degrade over time as we age. And as we have insults, I think a lot of the insults that we see are because of how we treat our bodies.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
I got a body work the other day and below the neck, they’re like, “[inaudible 01:03:17] your body is 30 years old.” I’m like, “Yeah. It feels like 30 years old.” I’m actually more fit, more muscular, more in shape than I was when I was 30 at 62 almost. So that’s possible if we understand the science of how to create health and how the body works. And that’s really the beautiful thing about your book, Life Force with Tony Robbins and Bob Hariri, which is I think an incredible contribution to the field of longevity science because it’s a colonoscopic view of everything that’s going on in the field. And a lot of people are sort of the [inaudible 01:03:48] longevity books out there, but they’re from experts or people who are focused on one particular slice. But you’re really taking a meta view at 30,000 feet and looking at what do we know, what do we not know, where is this all going? And how do we start to begin to incorporate some of these things in an intelligent way? And what are the things we need to be looking out for on the horizon?

Peter Diamandis:
I appreciate that summary. And the intention is we got a large advance for the book and we donated a 100% of all the proceeds to the research labs that we talk about in the book and other research labs. Again, I think I’m so thankful to be alive now compared to a hundred years ago, even 50 years ago. It’s an extraordinary time to be alive and we’re discovering so much. I spend an entire chapter talking about how exponential technologies are going to impact the entire reinvention of the healthcare industry and longevity. It’s amazing. And there’s no bigger business and no bigger impact. Oh, very cool. I’ll maybe close on this. A study recently done at Harvard, and Oxford, and the London School of Business concluded that for every year you can increase the average life expectancy of humanity, it’s worth 38 trillion to the global economy.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Wow.

Peter Diamandis:
38 trillion dollars. So imagine adding a decade of life. And I think my mission is be able to increase my health span by a decade. And then during that decade intercept, the next generation of technologies that will increase said by two decades and then three.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Who’s chasing that? All right. Well, let’s play tennis when we’re 200 together. How’s that?

Peter Diamandis:
I love that for sure.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
We’ll walk on the Venice borderwalk. We might go a little slower, but-

Peter Diamandis:
When you’re in town next, I would love to actually take you up on that tennis game.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
All right. I’m going to brag a little bit, but I noticed that if you actually understand this model and you start to work on it, you can actually achieve amazing levels of health at any age. I was just at a thing called Summon, which is a gathering of a group of folks. And there was mostly 30, 40 year olds there. And there was a workout class. And after the workout class, the chief is like, “Okay. We’re going to do plank and we’ll see who can last the longest.” And I’m like, “Okay. I’ll try. What do I know?” And everybody’s dropping, dropping, dropping, dropping. And I was the last one to drop after five minutes everybody dropped. And so here I’m probably 20 or 30 years older than most the people in that room, but by understanding how to work with my biology, through nutrition, and sleep, and exercise, and fitness. Actually it’s like the Tahoma Indians. They had this belief that these Indians, that there’s a grandpa called born to run the talks about them. They believe that as you got older, you got to be healthier and fitter.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
There were these native indigenous people from Mexico who used to run 100 mile distances. When they went and studied them from Harvard, they had better vital capacity in their lungs, better cardiovascular fitness, better VO2 max levels. All the things that we measure as objective metrics of aging, they were better than the 40 and the 20 year olds, which is pretty fascinating to me. I’m going to just reframe what we said at the beginning, which is, I think most of what we see as people age in this country is abnormal aging. It’s the consequence of the ravages of a horrible lifestyle, terrible diet, lack of exercise, too much stress, a lack of agency over our lives, and other things that are in our environment including toxins and pollution. And if we can learn how to sort of work with those things in our life, we can actually change the course of our own wellbeing health and we can start to sort of reimagine society in quite a different way because one of the things we didn’t really talk about was what happens when you have all these 150-year-olds running around the planet? What are they doing?

Peter Diamandis:
It’s another conversation my friend.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
Peter, it’s been so great to talk to you. Your work is so great. You work on the XPRIZE is reimagining and dreaming about the future, creating incentive to solve some of the world’s biggest problems

Peter Diamandis:
Like aging.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
One of the most positive, most optimistic, just brilliant people I know. And I’m just so thrilled you got to be on the podcast.

Peter Diamandis:
Yeah. Go to lifeforce.com. Everything that’s in the book is there. You can find about Fountain Life, you can find out about all of the research and such. Don’t be scared by the book at 600 and some odd pages. Read the first few chapters and then cherry pick the ones that are relevant to you. But be excited. It’s an extraordinary time to be alive. And I thank God that.

Dr. Mark Hyman:
It is. And I just signed up for your Longevity Insider at longevityinsider.org. So get that newsletter. You’ll be probably happy with what you find. If you love this podcast and you know people who are getting older, which is pretty much everybody, then make sure you share this podcast with them because it might change their life. Leave a comment on how you’ve hacked aging for yourself and understood how to actually reverse your biological age. We’d love to know. And to subscribe wherever get your podcast. And we’ll see you next week on The Doctor’s Farmacy.
Speaker 1:
Hi, everyone. I hope you enjoyed this week’s episode. Just a reminder that this podcast is for educational purposes only. This podcast is not a substitute for professional care by a doctor or other qualified medical professional. This podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. If you’re looking for help in your journey, seek out a qualified medical practitioner. If you’re looking for a functional medicine practitioner, you can visit ifm.org and search there, find a practitioner database. It’s important that you have someone in your corner who’s trained, who’s a licensed healthcare practitioner, and can help you make changes especially when it comes to your health.

If you are looking for personalized medical support, we highly recommend contacting Dr. Hyman’s UltraWellness Center in Lenox, Massachusetts today.

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